Nine Commentaries Pt 2: The Beginnings of the Chinese Communist

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Nine Commentaries Pt 2: The Beginnings of the Chinese Communist

The award-winning “Nine Commentaries on the Communist Party” has inspired hundreds of millions of Chinese people to renounce their ties with the CCP. This video series is based on the book, published in 15 languages and available here: http://www.ninecommentaries.com

Foreword

According to the book Explaining Simple and Analyzing Compound Characters (Shuowen Jiezi) written by Xu Shen (d. 147 AD in the Eastern Han Dynasty), the traditional Chinese character Dang, meaning “party” or “gang,” consists of two radicals that correspond to “promote or advocate” and “dark or black” respectively. Putting the two radicals together, the character means “promoting darkness.” “Party” or “party member” (which can also be interpreted as “gang” or “gang member”) carries a derogatory meaning. Confucius said, “A nobleman is proud but not aggressive, sociable but not partisan.” The footnotes of Analects (Lunyu) explain, “People who help one another conceal their wrongdoings are said to be forming a gang (party).” In Chinese history, political cliques were often called Peng Dang (cabal). It is a synonym for “gang of scoundrels” in traditional Chinese culture and is associated with the implication of ganging up for selfish purposes.

Why did the Communist Party emerge, grow and eventually seize power in contemporary China? The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has constantly instilled into the Chinese people’s minds that history has chosen the CCP, that the people have chosen the CCP, and that “without the CCP there would be no new China.”

Did the Chinese people choose the Communist Party? Or, did the Communist Party gang up and force Chinese people to accept it? We must find answers from history.

From the late Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) to the early years of the Republic period (1911-1949), China experienced tremendous external shocks and extensive attempts at internal reform. Chinese society was in painful turmoil. Many intellectuals and people with lofty ideals wanted to save the country and its people. However, in the midst of national crisis and chaos, their sense of anxiety grew, leading first to disappointment and then complete despair. Like people who turn to any available doctor in times of illness, they looked outside China for their solutions. When the British and French styles failed, they switched to the Russian method. They did not hesitate to prescribe the most extreme remedy for the illness, in the hope that China would quickly become strong.

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